I once had a radio just like this one below, a Garod 5D. Portable/AC/DC tube AM radio. It was broken, got tossed 30 years ago. I did find the remains of the chassis, here is the tube placement chart.

I just got another one from an ebay auction. After a recap it works reasonably well. I removed the insides of the battery. I have to see if I can find the tray for the filament batteries and the back from my old set. A long shot...

I did that tear-apart in 1971, which means I got the "new" one in 2001.
The circuit of this set is fairly typical of a tube portable:

GE C435A (blame this radio for getting
me into electronics and electrical
engineering!). Acquired in 1970.




I always knew GE was a Mickey Mouse operation! Model C2418A


This GE 422 radio is not "rare", it is "well done" :-). A leading consumer journal rated the GE 422 as "very good" back in 1953. It has an RF amp stage, three gang tuning capacitor, and good audio. It is a very good radio, nice DX machine, especially with a 12SG7 tube in place of the 12SK7 in the RF stage and a 19HR6 in place of the 12BA6 in the IF stage. Below is an advertisement about this radio:

This FM tuner uses octal tubes! Model XFM-1



model T1140A


Combination digital clock and digitally tuned radio receiver. Keyboard gets dirty quickly, making keys inoperative. Long term fix: disassemble keypad, clean contacts, then place a plastic sheet (cut from a zip-lock bag) between the metal keytops and the black foam holding the plastic keytops in place. Did this 4 years ago, keyboard still works fine.




The GE model 1284A set above needed its high voltage audio output transistor replaced. Used an NPN bipolar transistor from the switching power supply of a junked monochrome monitor to replace it, worked fine. If you have a GE radio like this one that is dead, check the output transistor. I've had several with bad output transistors.

This GE C1580Z is the 1284A with clock.




The homebrew set on the right uses GE circuit boards almost identical to those in the GE T1290A set above and the GE T2240H set below.

Note the unusual calibration of the AM dial of the homebrew set.

< GE model T2240H .



My brother had a Grundig set very similar if not the same as this one, but he needed room so he sold it to a radio collector.

A garage sale find for $5.00 and after a switch cleaning and recap works fine. AM/FM table set with 3 tubes. Hot chassis, don't let the power transformer fool you, it's just for the heaters.