Space art I made up myself

This page is of various space art pictures I edited up with various computer picture editors. Some feature Saturn and similar fictional ringed planets. Others feature the odd orbital geometry of Uranus' axial tilt and orbital tilt of its moons. A few show "the forth moon of Yavin" (from the first _Star Wars_ movie), an Earth-like planet orbiting a Jupiter-like planet. With the recent extrasolar planets discovered, a few are like Yavin in distance from their stars, the right distance to have a life-bearing "Earth" for a moon. See the bottom of this page for a map of these planetary systems. Click here for the extrasolar planets web site for current science fact discoveries. And here for a page of art from the Topps' 1958 series _Space Cards_

But first, a picture done the old fashioned way:



Nix transiting Pluto, and Charon as seen from Hydra.

Plutorise on Kerberos

Pluto seen from Charon Real Pluto photos, tinted, looks like space art.

Uranus . .
Solar eclipse on March 20, 2015 as seen from the Sun

An astronaut doing a moon walk on Iapetus, an outer moon of Saturn.

Left: As the Cassini probe has found large seas of methane on Titan, near its north pole, imagine seeing Saturn via infrared vision, over the sea. Center: Using a Cassini Saturn image, a scene as viewed from Minas. Right, Titan and Saturn seen from Hyperion, composite of Cassini JPL pix.


If you arrange the geometry right, you could get total solar eclipses happening at the Saturn moon system. As the plane of moon orbits is the same as that of the rings, the time for this to happen needs to be at rings edge on to the Sun. And select one moon as seen from another to be the same apparent size as the Sun seen from Saturn's orbit. And get them to line up. At Rhea, Saturn looks about 200 times bigger than the Sun. The Sun is about 0.06 degree diameter, and Saturn about 12 degrees from Rhea. Other moons are variable size as they travel around in their orbits, and can be bigger than the Sun. And be big enough to eclipse the Sun without Saturn blocking the Sun from view. You're on Rhea and Dione is eclipsing the Sun in the picture above.


Here it is midnight and at a spot on Iapetus, where only the back end of the sunlit rings of Saturn provide the light to illuminate the scene.


Earth and the Moon as seen with a large telescope on Mars. Note the Moon's farside is seen here.


The Moon in 3D (cross eye mode) Focus left eye on right side, right eye on left side. Hold your finger halfway from your eyes to the screen, focus on the finger as it covers over a common feature in both sides of the picture. Shift your eyes to the picture, then you should see 3D.

Jupiter in parallel mode 3D crosseyed Moon


(X mode)
Saturn
In infrared light.

An exoplanet, HD28185b, that might be just like Yavin, has been found. Of course, we don't know if it has an Earth for a moon.

If Yavin's rings were always edge on

Another Death Star...
Mimas looks a bit like the Death Star.



Triton geyser in 3D: Voyager 2 pix in parallel mode



Looks a little like a shark, doesn't it? (parallel mode)


Eros in 3D, cross eye mode.

Asteroid 2867 Steins in 3D, cross eye mode.


The Milky Way is a barred spiral

51 Peg and its hot Jupiter as seen from the sky of a possible terrestrial planet an AU out.

A view of Tau Boo and its planet


The below picture is a derivative work, an old space exploration scene by Quinn, made into 3-D:
Cross-eye mode: Focus left eye on right side, right eye on left side. Hold your finger halfway from your eyes to the screen, focus on the finger as it covers over a common feature in both sides of the picture. Shift your eyes to the picture, then you should see 3D.

3-D space image, make your eyes go wally-eyed, left eye looking at the left "o", right eye on the right "o" at the top of the image. Saturn and its moons will appear to be closer than the background stars, and the moons at various depths.

below is the text if you want to save and edit this html file:

                       o                o


         +    *        .  +    *        .  +
                  *    .           *    .
          .         .      .        .       .
         ,     ,.  -- )-- ,   , . -- )-- ,     , .
       '                '             '
         .       *        .       *        .
     .            +   .            +   .
        .                .                .